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BrotherEastman
04-25-2009, 08:18 AM
Okay, what do Apostolics do when your two year old throws a tantrum? How do we show love to a toddler who wants to always get his way? Maybe we spoil him too much. *shrugs*

Sam
04-25-2009, 08:34 AM
He's going through the "terrible two's"
Just keep loving him like your Heavenly Father keeps loving you when you throw "tantrums"
This too shall pass

nahkoe
04-25-2009, 08:43 AM
Okay, what do Apostolics do when your two year old throws a tantrum? How do we show love to a toddler who wants to always get his way? Maybe we spoil him too much. *shrugs*

Nah...throwing fits is pretty typical no matter what. My 4 year old *still* throws those spectacalar fits. He's more stubborn than your average bear though.

And, a toddler always wanting to get his way is typical too. :) That's what toddlers do!

At 2, he's just starting to figure out he's a separate person. This concept is blowing his little mind. He's gotta check this out, how does this work? Why does this work? It's probably kind of scary too, to realize he's not really just a part of you and mama. And overwhelming. Change always is...

Calm consistency is the key.

He asks, you say no. He throws fit. Whatever you do, DO NOT GIVE IT TO HIM NOW! lol You will live to regret that if you do.

A lot of the time, distraction is the key. "I know you really want X. You can't have X right now. Would you like A?" Or if he can have it later, but not right now..I'd use "first, then" to explain time. "First, we have to pick up your toys, then you can have a piece of candy."

And about distraction? Seriously..."Wow...did you see that airplane in the sky!?!" can be a lifesaver! lol Sometimes they just get "stuck" on something and need to be jump started to get out of it.

There's also a saying, HALT. Hungry, angry, lonely, tired. Most tantrums fit into one of these. Figuring out which one can help you figure out how to solve the problem, or even minimize how often it's happening if you get really good at keeping track of those needs. A lot of the time I'd sit down on the couch and snuggle while we watched a movie (reading a book works too!) when the fits were really bad. Sometimes we'd snuggle and they'd get back up to play and be happy for hours. Sometimes they'd fall asleep while snuggling and wake up in a much better mood. I'd usually throw a snack in too, they're not usually allowed in the living room so it was a novelty and would make sure they weren't hungry and flipping out cuz their blood sugar was low. I never have figured out a quick trick for angry though.

Good luck! Toddlers are awesome little peoples. Exhausting creatures though. lol

nahkoe
04-25-2009, 08:52 AM
http://aolff.org/aolff2/

This is an old friend of mine. She was a great help when my older kids were younger. Maybe something there will give you some ideas or at least some reassurance that this is so very normal. :)

BrotherEastman
04-25-2009, 09:57 AM
http://aolff.org/aolff2/

This is an old friend of mine. She was a great help when my older kids were younger. Maybe something there will give you some ideas or at least some reassurance that this is so very normal. :)
Thanks for sharing the sight.

MissBrattified
04-25-2009, 10:22 AM
Okay, what do Apostolics do when your two year old throws a tantrum? How do we show love to a toddler who wants to always get his way? Maybe we spoil him too much. *shrugs*

Tantrums are usually about getting your attention, and/or trying to force your hand on something. Both ploys are easily foiled by walking away. :)

Our girls hardly ever threw tantrums, but Jeffrey did try his best a few times. It's very simple--if it's a public tantrum, we leave the public immediately--without whatever it was that was being demanded. IF there were any nice things in the cart prior to the tantrum (other than necessities), they are immediately put back without negotiation.

Children will very quickly learn that tantrums get them nothing. Asking nicely MIGHT get them something, but if it doesn't, a tantrum may cost them something.

If its an at home tantrum, walking away or ignoring it is a good ploy--UNLESS they're upset because you're too busy to listen or respond to a real need. Jeffrey still gets upset if he's talking and the girls interrupt him or finish his sentences for him. That's legitimate, and in those cases, we calm him down, then correct the girls for interrupting, and allow him to continue talking.

But if its the old-fashioned Royale Temper Tantrum, because they don't want to pick up their toys--well, always win those battles. ;)

You know I'm not much of a spanker, so this won't come as a surprise, but I've never spanked my kids for throwing a fit. And none of them have thrown very many. Direct disobedience can earn a spanking, or telling me "No" can earn a swat on the behind. But screaming, kicking, and turning red in the face is just an immature emotional reaction. I've been known to laugh out loud and leave the room. :D

jaxfam6
04-25-2009, 11:33 AM
you need to stick to your guns and remember no matter how bad he acts, NO is still NO. Correct them when they need it. Make them understand what is exceptable behavior and what is not.
If you tell them you are going to do something if they continue then you had better go through with it, so becareful what you tell them you will do.

Oh, and if they act up in a store. Invite everyone over to watch them act up. Then stand back and laugh. Worked for us. =) He stopped acting up in the stores.
Another one that worked was getting the cart full of things that we knew they wanted and they continued to act up and so we left EVERYTHING in the cart and left the store. That sure slowed them down.

nahkoe
04-25-2009, 01:25 PM
you need to stick to your guns and remember no matter how bad he acts, NO is still NO. Correct them when they need it. Make them understand what is exceptable behavior and what is not.
If you tell them you are going to do something if they continue then you had better go through with it, so becareful what you tell them you will do.

Oh, and if they act up in a store. Invite everyone over to watch them act up. Then stand back and laugh. Worked for us. =) He stopped acting up in the stores.
Another one that worked was getting the cart full of things that we knew they wanted and they continued to act up and so we left EVERYTHING in the cart and left the store. That sure slowed them down.

I did that exactly once. The older 3 were old enough to all remember it and the 4th seems to have learned by osmosis. lol

Truthseeker
04-25-2009, 03:19 PM
Some tactile stumili works wonders.

BrotherEastman
04-25-2009, 08:38 PM
Some tactile stumili works wonders.
Tactile stimuli? Care to elaborate?

shawndell
04-26-2009, 05:19 AM
Brother Eastman I know that Rickie throws tantrums very seldom comared to when he was two,and he seems to listen a little better,but patrick just turned two and its his turn!!!

Truthseeker
04-26-2009, 07:10 AM
Tactile stimuli? Care to elaborate?

You know, swats, woopins, spanking etc......

BrotherEastman
04-26-2009, 12:30 PM
Brother Eastman I know that Rickie throws tantrums very seldom comared to when he was two,and he seems to listen a little better,but patrick just turned two and its his turn!!!
Ben will be two on the first of May, but I think he's ahead of the game. LOL!

BrotherEastman
04-26-2009, 12:33 PM
You know, swats, woopins, spanking etc......
Do you endorse such practice? nahkoa shared an excellent site which makes me think twice before I would spank my son or offer what you would call "tactile stimuli".

Praxeas
04-26-2009, 03:17 PM
I wonder if the dog whisperer can help? :thumbsup

MissBrattified
04-26-2009, 03:49 PM
Do you endorse such practice? nahkoa shared an excellent site which makes me think twice before I would spank my son or offer what you would call "tactile stimuli".

I'm not going to get into the spanking debate--and we have occasionally spanked our children--BUT, I don't see the need for spanking if something else will work as effectively, and sometimes more effectively.

The goal shouldn't be to stop your son from getting your attention--you want him to get it in an appropriate way. Nor should the goal be to stop him from asking you for anything--we want our children to ask us for things. The goal should be to get him to take "No" for an answer. :)

One way around the store tantrums is to give your child their own little allowance to spend. We started giving our children $3 a week when they were 3 (and upped it a $1 a year), and they've always used that to buy treats or small toys--or they can save it and buy something larger. We always make our kids pay for their own "extras", and they have to leave enough room in their budget to cover tax.

This is a tangent with a capital T, BUT--we do not pay our children to do chores. They don't earn their allowance. We have always kept their allowance separate from their work. In our house the rule is--if you're a part of the family, you work with the rest of the family until the work is done. :D They don't have the option of avoiding chores by saying, "Oh well, I don't need/want my allowance anyway."

Anyway, back to the topic...

My main disciplinary technique is natural consequences. With children, you often have to arrange natural consequences, but in the long run, I think they learn more from it than corporal punishment. Case in point: The natural consequence of throwing a temper tantrum in public is that the child absolutely does not get what he asks for, even after he calms down. It waits until the next visit. And there's ice cream on the way home from the store, either. The practical application being that once he is an adult, screaming at someone to get what he wants will have the opposite effect, so learning to be sweet, and accept a negative response is a good lesson to learn.

The only instance in which we've used corporal punishment 99.99% of the time is when our children have been in danger. If you have a 2 year old that suddenly dashes into the road, I don't see how to get the idea of danger across through "natural consequences", (because that would mean simulating getting hit by a car). 2 year olds can't be reasoned with or lectured like a 13 year old, so sometimes "tactile stimuli" might be the answer.

However. I would recommend that anyone who uses "tactile stimuli" on a regular basis try their belt, paddle, switch or hand on themselves first. Adults (especially men) are much stronger than they realize, and if you strike a child as hard as you can, it is MUCH too hard. :foottap



Wait...I said I wasn't going to discuss spanking, didn't I? How did that happen....:D

nahkoe
04-26-2009, 04:19 PM
Very good post. :)

My main disciplinary technique is natural consequences. With children, you often have to arrange natural consequences, but in the long run, I think they learn more from it than corporal punishment. Case in point: The natural consequence of throwing a temper tantrum in public is that the child absolutely does not get what he asks for, even after he calms down. It waits until the next visit. And there's ice cream on the way home from the store, either. The practical application being that once he is an adult, screaming at someone to get what he wants will have the opposite effect, so learning to be sweet, and accept a negative response is a good lesson to learn.

Natural and logical consequences are what I use most of the time too. Besides being effective, I think it teaches the kids to think and reason through things logically. Skills I want my kids to have as adults. I can't say "don't do.." and imagine every scenario they will encounter as teens and adults. But I can say "this didn't work out so well because of..." and hope the logic behind it sinks in. My older kids also seem to have learned how to graciously make mistakes, take responsibility for them, and make amends where appropriate. All skills I want them to have as adults.

The only instance in which we've used corporal punishment 99.99% of the time is when our children have been in danger. If you have a 2 year old that suddenly dashes into the road, I don't see how to get the idea of danger across through "natural consequences", (because that would mean simulating getting hit by a car). 2 year olds can't be reasoned with or lectured like a 13 year old, so sometimes "tactile stimuli" might be the answer.

Yep. I got three kids past the toddler stage. Then I had Justyn. All of my kids were runners, but he's a *runner* and even at 4 there is no reasoning with him. At least at 4 the threat of a spanking keeps him from running 99.9% of the time. He says he can run faster than the cars so they won't hit him. Oy...

Margies3
04-26-2009, 07:07 PM
You've heard some really good advice on here. Well, except for the suggestion of the spanking. I know all won't agree, but that's my opinion. I've done home daycare for an average of 6 little ones at a time for the past 24 years. I can count on ONE HAND the number of times I have punished with a swat on the behind. And when I did, I always made sure that the parents knew it had happened and why.

As far as tantrums go, the only other two pieces of advice I have for you are:

1) if the tantrum happens in my home, I have been known to simply pick the child up and take them to the bedroom and lay them on the bed. I then tell them that when they are finished, they are welcome to come out and join us again. But when they come out, I have to see a smile on their face. Usually they stay for a couple of minutes and then they're right back out with us and whatever they threw the fit over is forgotten.

2) The other thing that I ALWAYS do with the daycare little ones is that if we are going to the store, I give them clear instructions BEFORE we walk into the store. They know that they have to stay either on the cart or right beside it. They are not allowed to touch anything. And they are not allowed to ask for things, unless it is something like "Can we have green beans for lunch?". But no asking for candy or toys. At the end of the shopping trip, IF they have been good and I have not had to correct them, then SOMETIMES they will get a treat. Something small like a small candy or bubbles or something like that. If everyone else was good, but one child had to be spoken to repeatedly, then I will get for everyone else, but not for that one child. And they know that they do NOT get something every single time we go to the store. Most times we don't. But if they've not behaved, then they absolutely will not. If they have behaved, then they might :) That's usually plenty of incentive.

MissBrattified
04-26-2009, 07:21 PM
Good post, Margie. I think you made an important point--with young children, you should state your expectations before you go into the store! And offer reminders, if necessary.

Truthseeker
04-27-2009, 07:54 AM
Do you endorse such practice? nahkoa shared an excellent site which makes me think twice before I would spank my son or offer what you would call "tactile stimuli".

One of them anti spanking sites? I'll take a look if you post it. Hard to overlook scripture on the subject though.

shawndell
04-27-2009, 08:33 AM
brother I would have to agree with Mrs Brattifield about her ways of detureing a child from unwanted actions.Because thats how we as adults learn also.We make choices and if those choices cause problems,we wont make those same choices again.Its a learning process!Benji is learning at two what his little mind is capable of at two and it is hard work for us adults to show these little poeple what is right.LOL.

Pragmatist
04-27-2009, 11:01 AM
One of them anti spanking sites? I'll take a look if you post it. Hard to overlook scripture on the subject though.

Well that particular site uses scripture also. Does God use physical punishment on you?

Digging4Truth
04-27-2009, 11:09 AM
Through 3 kids we did not tolerate tantrums of any sort.

Tantrums were met with a swift and unwavering response. They learned quickly that throwing a tantrum bought them an immediate and a formidable response.

And, yes, I mean spankings.

But... tantrums start early and should be dealt with early. If the child is of an older age then I don't really know how to deal with things once they get out of control.

Truthseeker
04-27-2009, 11:25 AM
Well that particular site uses scripture also. Does God use physical punishment on you?

Not yet thankGod, but did he on sodom and gomorrah? How about them in Corinthians that drank communnion unworthily that were sick and dying? Jonah in the belly of the whale?

Truthseeker
04-27-2009, 11:26 AM
Through 3 kids we did not tolerate tantrums of any sort.

Tantrums were met with a swift and unwavering response. They learned quickly that throwing a tantrum bought them an immediate and a formidable response.

And, yes, I mean spankings.

But... tantrums start early and should be dealt with early. If the child is of an older age then I don't really know how to deal with things once they get out of control.

Exactly, early and consistent.

Digging4Truth
04-27-2009, 11:39 AM
Exactly, early and consistent.

Indeed...

And everyone please understand me. I am not talking about jerking a child up and beating the living fire out of them.

All discipline must take place on an age appropriate level and the older the child is the more you transition towards your words because they can understand and change their behavior.

I NEVER spank on a first offense. If a child does something wrong then we will discuss it. I will explain the offensive behavior, why it is offensive and what my expectations are.

If, upon our having such a discussion, this behavior continues then the likelihood of a spanking increases although I have to judge whether this is intentional disobedience or if we need to discuss this another time or two to give them the chance to incorporate the change into their behavior.

Once the child is old enough to understand... no form of discipline should go on, in my opinion, unless the child has been sat down and has had the offense calmly explained to them. They must be taught before there can be a wrong no matter who much I think that this should be "common sense".

I believe in spanking when it is appropriate... but spanking, in my home, only comes after the child has been calmly taught what the expectations are and is demonstrating willing disobedience to my expectations.

Then, once we reach that point, consistency is the key. They must be able to have complete faith that, when they willfully disobey me, I will NOT let them down. I will NOT fail them. What I have promised (whatever that discipline might be) I will deliver.

And... when the discipline has been delivered I hug them and let them know that I am not angry at them, I don't dislike them... they are my children and I love them... it was simply necessary that we do this because they refused to obey me and for some reason the spanking can get a message to their brain my words could not.

And never in anger... After I have explained to them that we have had this discussion before and having pointed out to them that I gave them ample opportunity for us to find ourselves here in disciplinary action... only then do we proceed with a spanking.

My children know spankings well. But they also know full well that, when we have to go there, that this is purely the result of their actions and that I have given them ample opportunity to avoid this but their refused to change their behavior and that is why we are here doing this.

Pragmatist
04-27-2009, 03:49 PM
Not yet thankGod, but did he on sodom and gomorrah? How about them in Corinthians that drank communnion unworthily that were sick and dying? Jonah in the belly of the whale?

Natural consequences. God shows us grace and mercy. He allows us to suffer natural consequences for our actions, but doesn't punish us for our disobedience.

BrotherEastman
04-27-2009, 03:56 PM
One of them anti spanking sites? I'll take a look if you post it. Hard to overlook scripture on the subject though.
LOL! You and I have had lots of discussions on tithing and context; do you think that it is just as possible to take Proverbs out of context when we incorporate physical punishment? Don't get me wrong, I'm not debating this issue, I'm just trying to explore options that will not provoke the wrath of my son. *wink*

BrotherEastman
04-27-2009, 03:59 PM
brother I would have to agree with Mrs Brattifield about her ways of detureing a child from unwanted actions.Because thats how we as adults learn also.We make choices and if those choices cause problems,we wont make those same choices again.Its a learning process!Benji is learning at two what his little mind is capable of at two and it is hard work for us adults to show these little poeple what is right.LOL.
I think Miss Brattified and Margie have given wise council. I also believe that everyone here is raising thier children to the best of thier God given ability. I have enjoyed what everyone has said thus far.

BrotherEastman
04-27-2009, 04:01 PM
Indeed...

And everyone please understand me. I am not talking about jerking a child up and beating the living fire out of them.

All discipline must take place on an age appropriate level and the older the child is the more you transition towards your words because they can understand and change their behavior.

I NEVER spank on a first offense. If a child does something wrong then we will discuss it. I will explain the offensive behavior, why it is offensive and what my expectations are.

If, upon our having such a discussion, this behavior continues then the likelihood of a spanking increases although I have to judge whether this is intentional disobedience or if we need to discuss this another time or two to give them the chance to incorporate the change into their behavior.

Once the child is old enough to understand... no form of discipline should go on, in my opinion, unless the child has been sat down and has had the offense calmly explained to them. They must be taught before there can be a wrong no matter who much I think that this should be "common sense".

I believe in spanking when it is appropriate... but spanking, in my home, only comes after the child has been calmly taught what the expectations are and is demonstrating willing disobedience to my expectations.

Then, once we reach that point, consistency is the key. They must be able to have complete faith that, when they willfully disobey me, I will NOT let them down. I will NOT fail them. What I have promised (whatever that discipline might be) I will deliver.

And... when the discipline has been delivered I hug them and let them know that I am not angry at them, I don't dislike them... they are my children and I love them... it was simply necessary that we do this because they refused to obey me and for some reason the spanking can get a message to their brain my words could not.

And never in anger... After I have explained to them that we have had this discussion before and having pointed out to them that I gave them ample opportunity for us to find ourselves here in disciplinary action... only then do we proceed with a spanking.

My children know spankings well. But they also know full well that, when we have to go there, that this is purely the result of their actions and that I have given them ample opportunity to avoid this but their refused to change their behavior and that is why we are here doing this.
Good post.

MissBrattified
04-27-2009, 04:47 PM
I agree with D4T that consistency is KEY!!!! No matter how you discipline--if you're inconsistent, your children will be constantly pushing the boundaries--because they're confused as to where those boundaries actually are!

Pick your battles wisely--but IF and WHEN you pick one--make sure you win it. ;)

nahkoe
04-27-2009, 04:52 PM
I agree with D4T that consistency is KEY!!!! No matter how you discipline--if you're inconsistent, your children will be constantly pushing the boundaries--because they're confused as to where those boundaries actually are!

Pick your battles wisely--but IF and WHEN you pick one--make sure you win it. ;)

This is quite probably the most important part of parenting. No matter how you discipline, no matter what you allow or don't allow, you MUST be consistent.

Ferd
04-28-2009, 12:16 PM
Levi got into this thing at bedtime where he would really spin out of control, crying until he got sick. of course this was after Jack came along and generally Jack was asleep when it happened so the double trouble was dealing with a tantrum and dealing with him waking the baby and dealing with a crying baby all rolled into one.

somewhere along the way, I came on a unique solution.


When Levi started that, I would take him to the laundry room (farthest place from the sleeping baby in the house) put him on one 12'x12' tile and told him that was his "Cry Spot"

I sat in the kitchen in his view and let him know that he was not in trouble but if he needed to cry, he needed to stand in that one spot until he finished and that I would be right there (always where we could see each other) when he finished his crying.

first time he was able to cry for a couple of minutes. he tried to sit down, but I would make him stand up in that one tile and not move from it.

Next time, it lasted 30 seconds, after that he would start, i would say "lets go to your cry spot" and he would be done crying.

It worked great for us, but that only works at home....hope that helps....

BrotherEastman
04-28-2009, 04:18 PM
Levi got into this thing at bedtime where he would really spin out of control, crying until he got sick. of course this was after Jack came along and generally Jack was asleep when it happened so the double trouble was dealing with a tantrum and dealing with him waking the baby and dealing with a crying baby all rolled into one.

somewhere along the way, I came on a unique solution.


When Levi started that, I would take him to the laundry room (farthest place from the sleeping baby in the house) put him on one 12'x12' tile and told him that was his "Cry Spot"

I sat in the kitchen in his view and let him know that he was not in trouble but if he needed to cry, he needed to stand in that one spot until he finished and that I would be right there (always where we could see each other) when he finished his crying.

first time he was able to cry for a couple of minutes. he tried to sit down, but I would make him stand up in that one tile and not move from it.

Next time, it lasted 30 seconds, after that he would start, i would say "lets go to your cry spot" and he would be done crying.

It worked great for us, but that only works at home....hope that helps....
Actually Ferd, that was wisdom imparted. I appreciate you sharing that bit of experience. LOL!

Mrs. LPW
04-30-2009, 11:27 PM
Good stuff Nahkoe! My 3 1/2 yr old started the "terrible twos" at 18 months and still can throw a doozy. I like to think I'm still a decent parent!
My 18 month old is coming into his own now and can really let it fly when he's angry!

They are little people who don't know the proper outlet for thier frustrations yet. Nothing wrong with you Dad! I'm sure you're doing a great job Bro. Eastman!


Nah...throwing fits is pretty typical no matter what. My 4 year old *still* throws those spectacalar fits. He's more stubborn than your average bear though.

And, a toddler always wanting to get his way is typical too. :) That's what toddlers do!

At 2, he's just starting to figure out he's a separate person. This concept is blowing his little mind. He's gotta check this out, how does this work? Why does this work? It's probably kind of scary too, to realize he's not really just a part of you and mama. And overwhelming. Change always is...

Calm consistency is the key.

He asks, you say no. He throws fit. Whatever you do, DO NOT GIVE IT TO HIM NOW! lol You will live to regret that if you do.

A lot of the time, distraction is the key. "I know you really want X. You can't have X right now. Would you like A?" Or if he can have it later, but not right now..I'd use "first, then" to explain time. "First, we have to pick up your toys, then you can have a piece of candy."

And about distraction? Seriously..."Wow...did you see that airplane in the sky!?!" can be a lifesaver! lol Sometimes they just get "stuck" on something and need to be jump started to get out of it.

There's also a saying, HALT. Hungry, angry, lonely, tired. Most tantrums fit into one of these. Figuring out which one can help you figure out how to solve the problem, or even minimize how often it's happening if you get really good at keeping track of those needs. A lot of the time I'd sit down on the couch and snuggle while we watched a movie (reading a book works too!) when the fits were really bad. Sometimes we'd snuggle and they'd get back up to play and be happy for hours. Sometimes they'd fall asleep while snuggling and wake up in a much better mood. I'd usually throw a snack in too, they're not usually allowed in the living room so it was a novelty and would make sure they weren't hungry and flipping out cuz their blood sugar was low. I never have figured out a quick trick for angry though.

Good luck! Toddlers are awesome little peoples. Exhausting creatures though. lol

Mrs. LPW
04-30-2009, 11:29 PM
What a novel idea! I'm going to try this!


Levi got into this thing at bedtime where he would really spin out of control, crying until he got sick. of course this was after Jack came along and generally Jack was asleep when it happened so the double trouble was dealing with a tantrum and dealing with him waking the baby and dealing with a crying baby all rolled into one.

somewhere along the way, I came on a unique solution.


When Levi started that, I would take him to the laundry room (farthest place from the sleeping baby in the house) put him on one 12'x12' tile and told him that was his "Cry Spot"

I sat in the kitchen in his view and let him know that he was not in trouble but if he needed to cry, he needed to stand in that one spot until he finished and that I would be right there (always where we could see each other) when he finished his crying.

first time he was able to cry for a couple of minutes. he tried to sit down, but I would make him stand up in that one tile and not move from it.

Next time, it lasted 30 seconds, after that he would start, i would say "lets go to your cry spot" and he would be done crying.

It worked great for us, but that only works at home....hope that helps....

Jermyn Davidson
05-28-2009, 01:29 PM
Levi got into this thing at bedtime where he would really spin out of control, crying until he got sick. of course this was after Jack came along and generally Jack was asleep when it happened so the double trouble was dealing with a tantrum and dealing with him waking the baby and dealing with a crying baby all rolled into one.

somewhere along the way, I came on a unique solution.


When Levi started that, I would take him to the laundry room (farthest place from the sleeping baby in the house) put him on one 12'x12' tile and told him that was his "Cry Spot"

I sat in the kitchen in his view and let him know that he was not in trouble but if he needed to cry, he needed to stand in that one spot until he finished and that I would be right there (always where we could see each other) when he finished his crying.

first time he was able to cry for a couple of minutes. he tried to sit down, but I would make him stand up in that one tile and not move from it.

Next time, it lasted 30 seconds, after that he would start, i would say "lets go to your cry spot" and he would be done crying.

It worked great for us, but that only works at home....hope that helps....



I am so going to use this one day!


It also foreshadows an important attribute about our GOD!

While we're done crying, Our Father is right there and He will be there for us once we're done crying.

VeridicalAngel
09-18-2009, 11:28 PM
Try a new game called Stand Up Sit Down. Cures every thing!!!! They think it's great untl their leg muscles start to cramp.