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  #21  
Old 05-11-2018, 03:13 PM
Apostolic1ness Apostolic1ness is offline
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Re: Epigenetics: Can sin effect multiple generatio

The answer is yes in both the natural and spiritual.
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  #22  
Old 05-11-2018, 03:58 PM
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Amanah Amanah is offline
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Re: Epigenetics: Can sin effect multiple generatio

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Originally Posted by Apostolic1ness View Post
The answer is yes in both the natural and spiritual.
you are not a preacher I hope, you don't teach people that they are bound by the sins of their great great grand parents do you?
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  #23  
Old 05-11-2018, 04:10 PM
Aquila Aquila is offline
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Re: Epigenetics: Can sin effect multiple generatio

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Originally Posted by Amanah View Post
you are not a preacher I hope, you don't teach people that they are bound by the sins of their great great grand parents do you?
No one should teach or believe that.

What this is only illustrating is how some people might have an unexplainable predisposition or propensity towards a given sinful proclivity, habit, or behavior.

Also, think about phobias. They are often irrational. Why are they seemingly predisposed to irrationally suffer from outright panic, with their brain shifting into a fight or flight mode, if they find themselves stuck in an elevator?

Why do children born from those who suffer from PTSD often subject to having symptoms of PTSD and elevated cortisol levels, just like their parents, even though they never experienced the traumatic event personally?

It's not that anyone is "bound" or "trapped" in the sins or experiences of their parents. It is just a discovery of something that might explain why some people are born with various inherent predispositions.
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Old 05-11-2018, 04:29 PM
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Esaias Esaias is offline
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Re: Epigenetics: Can sin effect multiple generatio

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Originally Posted by Aquila View Post
No one should teach or believe that.

What this is only illustrating is how some people might have an unexplainable predisposition or propensity towards a given sinful proclivity, habit, or behavior.

Also, think about phobias. They are often irrational. Why are they seemingly predisposed to irrationally suffer from outright panic, with their brain shifting into a fight or flight mode, if they find themselves stuck in an elevator?

Why do children born from those who suffer from PTSD often subject to having symptoms of PTSD and elevated cortisol levels, just like their parents, even though they never experienced the traumatic event personally?

It's not that anyone is "bound" or "trapped" in the sins or experiences of their parents. It is just a discovery of something that might explain why some people are born with various inherent predispositions.
So Momma got stuck in an elevator once and her grandkids now have fear of elevators? And you think this is genetically based, CAUSED by granny's experience?

I'm not going to ask if you are serious.
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  #25  
Old 05-11-2018, 04:36 PM
Aquila Aquila is offline
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Re: Epigenetics: Can sin effect multiple generatio

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Originally Posted by Esaias View Post
So Momma got stuck in an elevator once and her grandkids now have fear of elevators? And you think this is genetically based, CAUSED by granny's experience?

I'm not going to ask if you are serious.
Well, more research is necessary before anyone can say for certain. However, studies have indicated that it is indeed a possibility.

Here's a short article on this if you didn't get a chance to watch the videos explaining how this appears to work:


Study finds that fear can travel quickly through generations of mice DNA

By Meeri Kim

December 7, 2013

A newborn mouse pup, seemingly innocent to the workings of the world, may actually harbor generations’ worth of information passed down by its ancestors.

In the experiment, researchers taught male mice to fear the smell of cherry blossoms by associating the scent with mild foot shocks. Two weeks later, they bred with females. The resulting pups were raised to adulthood having never been exposed to the smell.

Yet when the critters caught a whiff of it for the first time, they suddenly became anxious and fearful. They were even born with more cherry-blossom-detecting neurons in their noses and more brain space devoted to cherry-blossom-smelling.

The memory transmission extended out another generation when these male mice bred, and similar results were found.

Neuroscientists at Emory University found that genetic markers, thought to be wiped clean before birth, were used to transmit a single traumatic experience across generations, leaving behind traces in the behavior and anatomy of future pups.

The study, published online Sunday in the journal Nature Neuroscience, adds to a growing pile of evidence suggesting that characteristics outside of the strict genetic code may also be acquired from our parents through epigenetic inheritance. Epigenetics studies how molecules act as DNA markers that influence how the genome is read. We pick up these epigenetic markers during our lives and in various locations on our body as we develop and interact with our environment.

Through a process dubbed “reprogramming,” these epigenetic markers were thought to be erased in the earliest stages of development in mammals. But recent research — this study included — has shown that some of these markers may survive to the next generation.

“When I was in school, this was against Darwin — it was ridiculed,” said University of Pennsylvania neuroscientist Christopher Pierce, who was not involved in the study but previously discovered an epigenetic inheritance related to cocaine. Male rats whose fathers were exposed to cocaine chose to ingest less of the drug than those rats whose fathers never took cocaine.

Pierce says he believes this is an adaptive effect — because cocaine is a toxin, the fathers passed down information to their pups that would help them survive and avoid the substance.

In the past decade, the once-controversial field of epigenetics has blossomed. But proving epigenetic inheritance can be a daunting, needle-in-a-haystack undertaking. Researchers need to measure changes in offspring behavior and neuroanatomy, as well as tease out epigenetic markers within the father’s sperm.

The DNA itself doesn’t change, but how the sequence is read can vary wildly depending on which parts are accessible. Even though all the cells in our bodies share the same DNA, these markers can silence all the irrelevant genes so that a skin cell can be a skin cell, and not a brain cell or a liver cell.

“This fine-tuning of gene expression occurs by epigenetics,” said postdoctoral researcher and study author Brian Dias of Emory’s Yerkes National Primate Research Center.


For instance, methyl molecules can bind to the sequence and block access to genes. Other proteins called histones act like spools for the 2 meters of DNA, about 6.5 feet, crammed into every tiny nucleus in our bodies. Some areas are so tightly wound up that those parts unreadable.

Dias combined his interest in animal development with neurobiologist Kerry Ressler’s focus on the mechanisms of fear learning. They taught two groups of male mice to fear odors by zapping their feet with an electric shock every time they blew scented air into their cages. The experimental group became afraid of cherry blossoms with a hint of almond, and the control group feared alcohol.

After three days of fear conditioning, the cherry blossom mice later reproduced. The resulting offspring, having grown to adulthood, had a heightened jumpiness to the cherry blossom smell, despite never having been exposed to it. They had no overreaction to alcohol.

They could also pick up on lesser amounts of cherry blossom in the air, which reflected their changes in olfactory and brain anatomy. When Dias stained only the cherry-blossom-detecting olfactory neurons blue, he saw significantly more of them coding for that smell as compared with the control mice.

The researchers also artificially inseminated females using the sperm from the original fear-conditioned mice, to attempt to get rid of any possible socially transmitted effects between the fathers and the females. The results were the same, suggesting epigenetic inheritance rather than environment.

The findings were also verified by comparing the epigenetic markers on the DNA of sperm, specifically on the gene responsible for detecting cherry blossoms. On the sperm of the cherry-blossom-fearing mice, there was less of the methylation that can silence genes, possibly pointing to a mechanism of how the information got passed down.

Pierce was impressed by the thoroughness of Dias’s and Ressler’s study.

“It’s a compelling finding,” he said. “The fact that epigenetic changes happen in mammals is just amazing.”

Does this mean we as humans have also inherited generations of fears and experiences? Quite possibly, say scientists. Studies on humans suggest that children and grandchildren may have felt the epigenetic impact of such traumatic events such as famine, the Holocaust and the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“Those are really powerful studies — unfortunately so, since the effects have been detrimental to subsequent generations,” Dias said. But because environmental factors for human subjects can’t be controlled, it is difficult to parse out the effects of epigenetics alone.

There are some who are skeptical of even mammal studies of epigenetics, and Dias believes they are rightly so since the field of epigenetics is still relatively new.

“We’re still scratching the surface,” he said.

Kim is a freelance science journalist based in Philadelphia.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...=.0c82a502172d

So, yes. If an ancestor was a coal miner and experienced the trauma of being trapped in a mine collapse, that trauma and fear of death (through those related biochemical responses) might have produced genetic markers in their DNA. Those markers could conceivably be passed down to a child and/or grandchild resulting in their having claustrophobia, even though they had never been trapped in a tight space personally.

We are fearfully and wonderfully made.

I wonder if this could account for "instinct" in animal species? I find it interesting that many animals don't have to teach their young various things in relation to survival in the wild. Is this "instinctual knowledge" passed down through the creature's DNA???

Last edited by Aquila; 05-11-2018 at 04:53 PM.
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  #26  
Old 05-28-2018, 08:53 AM
RachelRose RachelRose is offline
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Re: Epigenetics: Can sin effect multiple generatio

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Originally Posted by Aquila View Post
Scientists believe that life experiences, especially those that are traumatic or powerfully emotional, can leave impressions on DNA and be passed down to subsequent generations providing genetic memory that influences behavior.

If this is true, can an egregious sin leave an impression on one's DNA that can be passed down to their descendants?

If so, might this be the basis of God's OT judgments that extend to the third and fourth generation???

Thoughts?



That is an interesting fact! If this is the case we have yet another situation that science proves the Bible. Oh wait, maybe it is the Bible is proving science.

I think it all goes together anyway.
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