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The Garden Path For the Green Thumbs among us, share your gardening secrets here!


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  #1  
Old 06-07-2013, 09:34 AM
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Esther Esther is offline
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Tomatoes

I have tomatoes when they get ripe they have black rot n the bottom.

Anyone know why or the cure?
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Old 06-07-2013, 10:43 AM
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Re: Tomatoes

Here is some good info...

http://www.veggiegardeningtips.com/t...ossom-end-rot/

I’ve received several questions from gardeners expressing concern over their home grown tomatoes that develop sunken brown spots or black rot on their bottoms which totally ruins the fruit.

The probable cause is a disease called Blossom End Rot which affects tomatoes, peppers, squash, and watermelons.
Cause and Symptoms of Blossom End Rot on Tomatoes

While there’s no way to save the individual tomatoes or other fruits that show signs of blossom end rot, overall it’s not a major concern for the organic gardener and the disease doesn’t spread or actually affect the plant itself. You’ll see more blossom end rot occurring on tomatoes early in the season with it appearing less frequently as the summer goes on.

8324 Tomato Blossom End Rot Tomato Blossom End RotBlossom End Rot is caused by a calcium deficiency and there are organic products on the market that can be applied to vegetable plants to help reduce the incidence of rot striking tomatoes and other susceptible fruits. Because the problem is usually temporary and will resolve itself I don’t recommend treating the plants with any type of spray to combat blossom end rot.

Often the problem has more to do with the moisture levels in the garden to regulate the delivery of nutrients than the amount of calcium available in the soil, and tomato rot will be more noticeable after periods of uneven precipitation such as when drought conditions are followed by periods of heavy rain.
Organic Control and Prevention of Blossom End Rot

So a better way to combat blossom end rot is to ensure that your growing beds contain plenty of organic matter to help maintain even moisture levels and by watering your tomatoes as needed during periods of low precipitation.

Some gardeners claim that planting tomatoes out in the garden before the soil has thoroughly warmed up can promote the occurrence of blossom end rot. Don’t plant those heirloom tomatoes, peppers, squash, eggplants, and watermelons out into the garden until the soil has had a chance to fully warm up.

Other precautions include avoiding cultivating too closely to the plants which may encourage blossom end rot by destroying the tiny feeder roots that grow close to the soil surface and supply moisture and nutrients to the plants.

Mulching the soil after temperatures rise will help to conserve the amount of moisture that is retained in the soil and prevent or lessen the amount of blossom end rot on your tomatoes and other vegetables.

For gardeners seeking a natural spray to control blossom end rot on tomatoes, peppers, and melons, “Garden’s Alive” sells a product called Rot-StopT Spray Tomato Blossom End Rotthat can be applied to your plants once a week to supplement calcium reserves and prevent rotting.

So don’t panic or be overly concerned if you see your tomatoes suffering with signs of blossom end rot early in the season. Simply remove the affected fruits that display the sunken rotten bottoms, irrigate to maintain even moisture, and be patient… that’s usually the most effective organic control to handle this common problem in the vegetable garden.
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Old 06-07-2013, 08:36 PM
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Re: Tomatoes

Thanks D4
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Old 06-07-2013, 09:22 PM
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Re: Tomatoes

I've also heard that putting crushed egg shells in the hole before you plant the tomato also helps curb blossom rot, or you can even take crushed egg shells now, and scatter them over the tomatoes. I also water my tomatoes with 2 tablespoons Epsom salt per gallon, when they begin to have blooms, and then do this every two weeks. Epsom salt is a natural fertilizer (magnesium) which tomatoes use heavily during fruit production.
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Old 06-08-2013, 03:33 AM
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Re: Tomatoes

I'm having the same problem with the tomatoes that we set out. Nice tomatoes form, but then get that black rot on the bottom. So frustrating!
I did try the egg shells and coffee grounds around my plants,
but didn't seem to help.
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Old 06-08-2013, 09:00 AM
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Re: Tomatoes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lacey View Post
I'm having the same problem with the tomatoes that we set out. Nice tomatoes form, but then get that black rot on the bottom. So frustrating!
I did try the egg shells and coffee grounds around my plants,
but didn't seem to help.
I've listed below a link to this site which answers some of your questions. I always thought that adding egg shells would help blossom end rot, but apparently, it has more to do with the moisture content of the soil. Check out the link for more info:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...131711418.html

Growing Tomatoes FAQ:

What is blossom-end rot? How can I prevent it?

Blossom-end rot is a disorder of tomato, squash, pepper, and all other fruiting vegetables. You notice that a dry sunken decay has developed on the blossom end (opposite the stem) of many fruit, especially the first fruit of the season. This is not a pest, parasite or disease process but is a physiological problem caused by a low level of calcium in the fruit itself.

Symptoms

BER, or blossom-end rot usually begins as a small "water-soaked looking" area at the blossom end of the fruit while still green. As the lesion develops, it enlarges, becomes sunken and turns tan to dark brown to black and leathery. In severe cases, it may completely cover the lower half of the fruit, becoming flat or concave, often resulting in complete destruction of the infected fruit.

Cause

Calcium is required in relatively large concentrations for normal cell growth. When a rapidly growing fruit is deprived of calcium, the tissues break down, leaving the characteristic lesion at the blossom end. Blossom-end rot develops when the fruit's demand for calcium exceeds the supply in the soil. This may result from low calcium levels in the soil, drought stress, excessive soil moisture, and/or fluctuations due to rain or overwatering . These conditions reduce the uptake and movement of calcium into the plant, or rapid, vegetative growth due to excessive nitrogen fertilization.

Management

Adequate preparation of the garden bed prior to planting is the key to preventing BER. Insure adequately draining soil in the bed by adding needed ammendments, maintain the soil pH around 6.5 - a pH out of this range limits the uptake of calcium. Lime (unless the soil is already alkaline), composted manures or bone meal will supply calcium but take time to work so must be applied prior to planting. Excess ammonial types of nitrogen in the soil can reduce calcium uptake as can a depleted level of phosphorus. After planting, avoid deep cultivation that can damage the plant roots, use mulch to help stabilize soil moisture levels and help avoid drought stress, avoid overwatering as plants generally need about one inch of moisture per week from rain or irrigation for proper growth and development.

Once the problem develops, quick fixes are difficult. Stabilize the moisture level as much as possible, feeding with manure or compost tea is recommended by many, foliar applications of calcium are of questionable value according to research because of poor absorption and movement to fruit where it is needed but many have reported that foliar application of magnesium (epsom salts) can effect added calcium uptake. Other various suggestions consist of powdered milk, crushed egg shells tea, bone meal tea, Tums tablets, etc. but prevention is the key. Some recommend removing affected fruit from to reduce stress in the plant.

BER should not be confused with fruit abortion or inadequate pollination although the symptoms may appear similar. The onset of BER occurs only after the fruit is well on it's way to development while insufficient pollination problems terminate the fruit while still quite small.
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Old 06-08-2013, 09:52 AM
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Re: Tomatoes

Thanks KBTW and D4T for the information.
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