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mizpeh 03-04-2010 09:18 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
I've recently finished a couple of books by Jack Deere and another book called "Take Your Glory, Lord". I enjoyed all of them.

mizpeh 03-04-2010 09:20 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sam (Post 883550)
I recently finished reading “Nine O’clock In The Morning” by Dennis J. Bennett, copyright 1970.

Dennis J. Bennett (born 10/28/17, died 11/1/91) was an Episcopal clergyman prominently identified with the Charismatic Renewal from the beginning. He was pastor of the St. Mark Episcopal Church in Van Nuys, CA., a congregation of about 2600, and in 1959 and early 1960, he and several others in the church were baptized in the Holy Spirit. The group of Spirit-filled believers in the congregation grew and and there was some division among church members over the experience. On April 3, 1960, Pastor Bennett announced his experience in a sermon to the congregation and later resigned his position as pastor. He then moved to St. Luke’s in Seattle and from there traveled nationally and internationally teaching on and ministering the Holy Spirit. At the time the book was written he estimated that between 8 and 10 thousand people had received the Holy Ghost Baptism through meetings in the Seattle area. The April 3, 1960 date is usually considered the beginning of the Charismatic Renewal so next month will be a 50 year anniversary.

The book starts out on his day off when a fellow Episcopal priest named Frank visited him and expressed concern about a couple of members in his (Frank’s) church. When Father Bennett asked him why he is concerned about his members, the priest says that, although they had been members of the church when he first came as pastor, they recently started coming to church on a regular basis, and seemed to be "enjoying" their religion. When asked, they explained that the reason for the big change in them is that they had recently been baptized in the Holy Spirit and had spoken with tongues.

Well, Father Bennett becomes intrigued and starts visiting with them and then attending some prayer meetings, talking to people, and investigating by reading the Bible. After about three months of cautiously looking on, he is told that if he wants to be baptized in the Spirit, all he has to do is ask for the experience. On a Saturday afternoon, Father Bennett and another priest from his diocese (not Frank) were in the couple’s home and it happened.

Here’s how the book describes the event on pages 20 and 21.

John came across the room and laid his hands first on my head, and then on my friend’s. He began to pray, very quietly, and I recognized the same thing as when Bud had prayed with me a few days before: he was speaking a language that I did not understand, and speaking it very fluently. He wasn’t a bit “worked up” about it either. Then he prayed in English for Jesus to baptize me in the Holy Spirit.

I began to pray, as he told me, and I prayed very quietly, too. I was not about to get even a little bit excited! I was simply following instructions. I suppose I must have prayed out loud for about twenty minutes --at least it seemed to be a log time-- and was just about to give up when a very strange thing happened. My tongue tripped, just as it might when you are trying to recite a tongue twister, and I began to speak in a new language!

Right away I recognized several things: first, it wasn’t some kind of psychological trick or compulsion. There was nothing compulsive about it. I was allowing these new words to come to my lips and was speaking them out of my own volition, without in any way being forced to do it. I wasn’t “carried away” in any sense of the word, but was fully in possession of my wits and my willpower. I spoke the new language because it was interesting to speak a language I had never learned, even though I didn’t know what I was saying. I had taken quite a while to learn a small amount of German and French, but here was a language “for free”! Secondly, it was a real language, not some kind of “baby-talk.” It had grammar and syntax: it had inflection and expression --and it was rather beautiful! I went on allowing these new words to come to my lips for about five minutes, then said to my friends: “Well, that must be what you mean by ‘speaking in tongues’ --but what is it all about? I don’t feel anything?”

They said joyfully, “Praise the Lord!”

This seemed a bit irrelevant and was a little strong for my constitution. It bordered on the fanatical for such a thing to be said by Episcopalians on a fine Saturday afternoon sitting right in the front room of their own home.

Did you like the book, Sam?

Sam 03-04-2010 10:08 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mizpeh (Post 883561)
Did you like the book, Sam?

Yes.
I started reading it several years ago but only got through about one chapter. Then it just became part of my library which contains hundreds of books that I have only partially read. Then I recently read something somewhere about April 30, 2010 being the 50th anniversary of Father Dennis Bennett's announcement of having received the Holy Ghost Baptism and I dug the book out and read it through.

I'm also on a forum called Apostolic Forum
http://apostolicforum.ning.com/main/...ment%3A2971%26
and have recently started a group there on Church History so I have posted a couple things about Dennis Bennett there.

Sam 03-04-2010 10:15 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mizpeh (Post 883561)
Did you like the book, Sam?

Yes, I like some of that Apostolic/Pentecostal/Charismatic history stuff.

I remember the nineteen sixties and the Charismatic Renewal Movement and I also remember the Jesus People. I and some others in the established Apostolic Churches had some problems with all these folks receiving the Holy Ghost Baptism and speaking with tongues. Because they did not look like us or believe like us, some of us wondered if they had the "real" Holy Ghost. It was as though we thought we had an exclusive franchise on God and people had to come to us to receive Him. How dare they avoid us and go directly to Him and receive from Him?

It took me a while but I've changed my mind on that many years ago.

*AQuietPlace* 03-04-2010 11:15 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
The Prodigal God
Pagan Christianity

Nitehawk013 03-05-2010 05:09 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
I am about to order Pagan Christianity.

I am going to re-read "The War Against Men" soon inpreperation for a sermon. The book focusses on how society in America now tears down the strong male role by mocking it and demeaning it. It makes it a joke or outdated cheauvenist ideal to be a strong man who leads his home. The result is the effiminate, weak structure of so many families and the increasing number of sissified children among many other really bad byproducts.

mizpeh 03-05-2010 09:07 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by *AQuietPlace* (Post 883647)
The Prodigal God
Pagan Christianity

I have Pagan Christianity but it's way down on my reading list.

Sam 03-07-2010 09:55 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
I just read "Receive Ye The Holy Ghost" copyright 2003 by the late A.A. Allen (1911 - 1970). He was an Assembly of God minister who had a ministry of healing. It is a short book (just 23 pages) and was probably transcribed from one of his sermons.

A.A. Allen, Jack Coe, Glenn Thompson, and C.M. Ward were instrumental in leading me into more light as a young Christian back in the nineteen fifties through their radio programs and their writings.

viggie 03-27-2010 03:04 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Just finished "A Woman After God's Own Heart" and was thoroughly impressed. It was a library copy so I didn't get a chance to really take my time and read all the references. But I've already ordered a set with the workbook so I can go through it again. :)

MissBrattified 03-27-2010 11:42 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
The Man Who Ate Everything by Jeffrey Steingarten

(borrowed from P, Margie. :))

viggie 03-28-2010 05:50 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Started Amish Peace: Simple Wisdom for a Complicated World last night. Very interesting.

telboy8 03-28-2010 06:10 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
When Ye Fast by Joy Haney.

Pentecostal books are great. What do you think?

Orthodoxy 04-01-2010 03:40 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
I'm always reading at least three books at the same time!

Currently, besides the Bible:

Seeing and Savoring Jesus Christ - John Piper
A Hunger for God - John Piper
Anxious for Nothing - John MacArthur
Worldliness: Resisting the Seduction of a Fallen World - C.J. Mahaney

telboy8 04-09-2010 09:22 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
I am reading God's Politics by Jim Wallis.

This is very interesting as the author is expounding on how christain values of helping the poor, building families and communities, repentance and self examination should influence ourselves and public policy.
Very thought provoking. It is actually an action book as it makes me want to get up and do something.



<a href="http://freeinthespirit.webs.com/">Visit My Website</a>

Sam 04-14-2010 06:24 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Recent reads:

The Miracles of Our Lord by Charles C. Ryrie, copyright 1984
A chapter on each of the 35 miracles by our Lord.


Some Stick With You
A Heartwarming Collection of Adoption Stories
by Randy T. Rogers, copyright 2010
Randy is a Probate Court Judge in Butler County, Ohio.
He is a member and a past president of our local FGBMFI group

crakjak 04-14-2010 06:29 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Just completed, "1776" by David McCullough,
Currently:
"Truman" by David McCullough
"Change Your Brain, Change Your Life" by Daniel G. Amen, M.D.
"Dead Sea Scrolls Scandal" by (can't remember and the book is in my car)
And I just bought Carl Rove's latest book, but haven't started it.

Sam 04-15-2010 10:29 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Just finished reading
The Baptism With The Holy Spirit
and the value of speaking with tongues today
by Oral Roberts
copyright 1964, reprinted 1975

Standard teaching on the Holy Ghost Baptism and also on speaking with tongues as the Apostle Paul dealt with the subject in 1 Corinthians chapters 12, 13, and 14

Kings Kid 04-17-2010 06:26 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
I'm reading "Shut the Hell Up" Slience the Roar. By Terry Tripp.

SOUNWORTHY 05-15-2010 01:20 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Daniel Segraves latest book: If God Loves, Why am I Hurting.

futurenurse88 09-16-2010 05:14 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
My anatomy and physiology textbook lol!!
The Thorn by Beverly Lewis
Letters to Jackie...more than a 100(of the thousands of)letters sent to Jackie Kennedy after her husband's assassination.

*AQuietPlace* 09-16-2010 08:41 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
The Help

Sam 11-30-2010 01:11 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
1 Attachment(s)
Last night (Nov. 29, 2010) I read a small 25 page booklet titled “Daniel Nash: Prevailing Prince of Prayer.” It is about a minister named Daniel Nash, some times called Father Nash, who worked with Chares Finney, an evangelist, in the 1800’s. Father Nash was born November 27, 1775 and died December 20, 1831 while on his knees in prayer. He was known as a “prayer warrior” or “intercessor.” He is virtually unknown in Christian history. He was a pastor but is not known for that or for his sermons. It seems his main calling in life was to support Carles Finney by praying for him and his meetings.

Charles Finney was born in Connecticut in 1792 and his family soon moved to western New York. He studied and practiced law from 1818 to 1821. He was converted in 1820 and decided to preach. He was licensed by the Presbyterian Church in 1824 and was known as a fiery evangelist. He preached throughout New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and the New England states. His most remarkable revival was in Rochester, New York where nearly three thousand were converted. He died in 1875. He was like the D.L. Moody or Billy Graham of his time.

Daniel Nash started as a preacher in upstate New York. His record there is singularly unremarkable. At age 48 he decided to give himself totally to prayer for Finney's meetings. Nash would come quietly into towns three or four weeks in advance of a meeting, gather three or four other like minded Christians with him and in a rented room start praying and bringing heaven near. It is reported that in one town all he could find was a dank, dark cellar, but that place was soon illumined with holy light as he made it the place of intercession.

When the public meetings started Father Nash would not usually attend but kept praying in his closet for the convicting power of the Holy Spirit to fall on the crowd and melt their hearts. When opposition arose Father Nash would pray all the harder.

Once a group of young men promised to break up the meetings. Nash was praying nearby and came out of the shadows to announce: "Now mark me, young men! God will break your ranks in less than one week, either by converting some of you, or by sending some of you to hell. He will do this certainly as the Lord is my God!"

Finney thought his friend had lost his sense. But by next Tuesday morning the leader of the group suddenly showed up, confessed his sinful attitude before Finney and accepted Christ. "What shall I do Mr. Finney?" he asked. Finney told him to go back to his companions and tell them how Christ had changed his life. Before that week was out nearly all of the original group had come to Christ.

In 1826 both Finney and Nash were burnt in effigy. The enemy recognized the threat of Father Nash's prayers to their ways of wickedness.

Shortly before Nash died in 1831 he wrote:

I am now convinced, it is my duty and privilege, and the duty of every other Christian, to pray for as much of the Holy Spirit as came down on the day of Pentecost, and a great deal more….My body is in pain, but I am happy in my God…..I have only just begun to understand what Jesus meant when he said, "All things whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive."

It is interesting to note that within four months of Father Nash's death Finney left the evangelistic field to take a Church in New York City. His prayer partner in taking the enemy by storm was gone. He whose prayers and been the strength of the campaigns was now in his eternal home and the loss of power was felt.

Father Nash's grave is in a neglected cemetery almost on the border of Canada in northern New York. The tombstone reads.

DANIEL NASH
Pastor
1816-1822

Laborer with Finney

Mighty in Prayer

Nov. 27, 1775 - Dec. 20, 1831

Daniel Nash was not written up in the papers of the day. The elite of his day took no notice of him. There was notice in Heaven of this humble man. Like Paul, the demons knew him by reputation. In his heart dwelt fully the burning Spirit of God. Great is his reward in Heaven.

The quote below is from a book by Kenneth Hagin titled, "The Interceding Christian." He talks about Charles Finney and the important part that prayer played in his evangelistic successes.

"Charles G. Finney stands out as one of the greatest exponents of evangelism since the days of the Apostle Paul. All theologians and church historians agree that Finney had the greatest success of any individual preacher since the days of Paul. Furthermore, in Finney's revivals 80 percent of all his converts stayed saved.

"In no other revival since the days of Paul has this been true. Moody was mightily used of God. Yet church historians agree that not more than 50 percent of his converts remained.

"Since the turn of the century we have seen a great revival in the Pentecostal movement. Yet Pentecostal leaders, both past and present, agree that not even 50 percent of the converts remain true to God. No one has had the success Finney had. Yet he never used any kind of gimmick. He didn't rely on sensationalism; he depended solely upon prayer.

"In his autobiography we read that when Finney would go into a town for a revival, almost the entire town would turn to God. After one such revival in which practically the entire city was converted, the only theater in town had to close down because no one attended. All the 'grog' shops, Finney's term for what we know today as beer joints, also had to close down after the revival.

"What was the secret of Finney's success? He said, 'There is no more secret, no more mystery to having a revival than there is to a farmer's reaping a crop. If the farmer tills the soil, puts the seed in the ground, and trusts God for the rain, then when the time comes there will be a harvest.'

"Finney had an elderly man working with him who was semi-retired from the ministry. People called him 'Father Nash.' Father Nash would go ahead of Finney three weeks in advance of a planned revival to try to get two or three people to enter into a covenant of prayer with him. Some one asked Finney what kind of man this Father Nash was. 'We never see him,' they said. 'He doesn't enter into any of the meetings.'

"Finney replied, 'Like anybody who does a lot of praying, Father Nash is a very quiet person.'

"Show me a person who is always talking and I'll show you a Christian who never does much praying.

"'On one occasion when I got to a town to start a revival,' Finney said, 'a lady who ran a boarding house contacted me. She said, 'Brother Finney, do you know a Father Nash? He and two other men have been at my boarding house for the last three days, but they haven't eaten a bite of food. I opened the door and peeped in at them because I could hear them groaning, and I saw them down on their faces. They have been this way for three days, lying prostrate on the floor and groaning. I thought something awful must have happened to them I was afraid to go in and I didn't know what to do. Would you please come see about them?'

"'No, it isn't necessary,' I replied. 'They just have a spirit of travail in prayer.'

"Finney prayed much himself. Rising every morning at 4 o'clock, he would go out into the country and pray until 8 o'clock."

pages 25 -27 of "The Interceding Christian" by Kenneth E. Hagin

BeenThinkin 11-30-2010 02:31 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Decision Points Pres George W. Bush.

Great book!

BT

Sabby 12-02-2010 10:43 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Just finished Courage and Consequence by the dark knight Karl Rove. muuahhhaaahaaa.

Actually, it's pretty interesting!

Digging4Truth 12-02-2010 11:05 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Crazy Love.

whoami 12-02-2010 11:07 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
"Mary Queen of Scots"

missourimary 12-02-2010 11:13 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Grace at Bender Springs
The Lazarus Child

nahkoe 12-02-2010 11:14 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Courageous Faith by Ed Hindson
Encountering the Old Testament by Bill Arnold and Bryan E Beyer
Theology for Today by Elmer Towns
Philosophy of Religion by C. Stephen Evans and R. Zachary Manis
The Story of the World Volume 1 by Susan Wise Bauer
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

onefaith2 12-02-2010 11:19 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sam (Post 995445)
Last night (Nov. 29, 2010) I read a small 25 page booklet titled “Daniel Nash: Prevailing Prince of Prayer.” It is about a minister named Daniel Nash, some times called Father Nash, who worked with Chares Finney, an evangelist, in the 1800’s. Father Nash was born November 27, 1775 and died December 20, 1831 while on his knees in prayer. He was known as a “prayer warrior” or “intercessor.” He is virtually unknown in Christian history. He was a pastor but is not known for that or for his sermons. It seems his main calling in life was to support Carles Finney by praying for him and his meetings.

Charles Finney was born in Connecticut in 1792 and his family soon moved to western New York. He studied and practiced law from 1818 to 1821. He was converted in 1820 and decided to preach. He was licensed by the Presbyterian Church in 1824 and was known as a fiery evangelist. He preached throughout New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and the New England states. His most remarkable revival was in Rochester, New York where nearly three thousand were converted. He died in 1875. He was like the D.L. Moody or Billy Graham of his time.

Daniel Nash started as a preacher in upstate New York. His record there is singularly unremarkable. At age 48 he decided to give himself totally to prayer for Finney's meetings. Nash would come quietly into towns three or four weeks in advance of a meeting, gather three or four other like minded Christians with him and in a rented room start praying and bringing heaven near. It is reported that in one town all he could find was a dank, dark cellar, but that place was soon illumined with holy light as he made it the place of intercession.

When the public meetings started Father Nash would not usually attend but kept praying in his closet for the convicting power of the Holy Spirit to fall on the crowd and melt their hearts. When opposition arose Father Nash would pray all the harder.

Once a group of young men promised to break up the meetings. Nash was praying nearby and came out of the shadows to announce: "Now mark me, young men! God will break your ranks in less than one week, either by converting some of you, or by sending some of you to hell. He will do this certainly as the Lord is my God!"

Finney thought his friend had lost his sense. But by next Tuesday morning the leader of the group suddenly showed up, confessed his sinful attitude before Finney and accepted Christ. "What shall I do Mr. Finney?" he asked. Finney told him to go back to his companions and tell them how Christ had changed his life. Before that week was out nearly all of the original group had come to Christ.

In 1826 both Finney and Nash were burnt in effigy. The enemy recognized the threat of Father Nash's prayers to their ways of wickedness.

Shortly before Nash died in 1831 he wrote:

I am now convinced, it is my duty and privilege, and the duty of every other Christian, to pray for as much of the Holy Spirit as came down on the day of Pentecost, and a great deal more….My body is in pain, but I am happy in my God…..I have only just begun to understand what Jesus meant when he said, "All things whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive."

It is interesting to note that within four months of Father Nash's death Finney left the evangelistic field to take a Church in New York City. His prayer partner in taking the enemy by storm was gone. He whose prayers and been the strength of the campaigns was now in his eternal home and the loss of power was felt.

Father Nash's grave is in a neglected cemetery almost on the border of Canada in northern New York. The tombstone reads.

DANIEL NASH
Pastor
1816-1822

Laborer with Finney

Mighty in Prayer

Nov. 27, 1775 - Dec. 20, 1831

Daniel Nash was not written up in the papers of the day. The elite of his day took no notice of him. There was notice in Heaven of this humble man. Like Paul, the demons knew him by reputation. In his heart dwelt fully the burning Spirit of God. Great is his reward in Heaven.

The quote below is from a book by Kenneth Hagin titled, "The Interceding Christian." He talks about Charles Finney and the important part that prayer played in his evangelistic successes.

"Charles G. Finney stands out as one of the greatest exponents of evangelism since the days of the Apostle Paul. All theologians and church historians agree that Finney had the greatest success of any individual preacher since the days of Paul. Furthermore, in Finney's revivals 80 percent of all his converts stayed saved.

"In no other revival since the days of Paul has this been true. Moody was mightily used of God. Yet church historians agree that not more than 50 percent of his converts remained.

"Since the turn of the century we have seen a great revival in the Pentecostal movement. Yet Pentecostal leaders, both past and present, agree that not even 50 percent of the converts remain true to God. No one has had the success Finney had. Yet he never used any kind of gimmick. He didn't rely on sensationalism; he depended solely upon prayer.

"In his autobiography we read that when Finney would go into a town for a revival, almost the entire town would turn to God. After one such revival in which practically the entire city was converted, the only theater in town had to close down because no one attended. All the 'grog' shops, Finney's term for what we know today as beer joints, also had to close down after the revival.

"What was the secret of Finney's success? He said, 'There is no more secret, no more mystery to having a revival than there is to a farmer's reaping a crop. If the farmer tills the soil, puts the seed in the ground, and trusts God for the rain, then when the time comes there will be a harvest.'

"Finney had an elderly man working with him who was semi-retired from the ministry. People called him 'Father Nash.' Father Nash would go ahead of Finney three weeks in advance of a planned revival to try to get two or three people to enter into a covenant of prayer with him. Some one asked Finney what kind of man this Father Nash was. 'We never see him,' they said. 'He doesn't enter into any of the meetings.'

"Finney replied, 'Like anybody who does a lot of praying, Father Nash is a very quiet person.'

"Show me a person who is always talking and I'll show you a Christian who never does much praying.

"'On one occasion when I got to a town to start a revival,' Finney said, 'a lady who ran a boarding house contacted me. She said, 'Brother Finney, do you know a Father Nash? He and two other men have been at my boarding house for the last three days, but they haven't eaten a bite of food. I opened the door and peeped in at them because I could hear them groaning, and I saw them down on their faces. They have been this way for three days, lying prostrate on the floor and groaning. I thought something awful must have happened to them I was afraid to go in and I didn't know what to do. Would you please come see about them?'

"'No, it isn't necessary,' I replied. 'They just have a spirit of travail in prayer.'

"Finney prayed much himself. Rising every morning at 4 o'clock, he would go out into the country and pray until 8 o'clock."

pages 25 -27 of "The Interceding Christian" by Kenneth E. Hagin

This type of prayer committment is what we all need. What a mighty revival we could see, but will we sacrifice at this level? I think we all have to make that decision. I would that I had already had this kind of committment. I wonder if Father Nash was married, had family or had to work? Who knows but this my friend was a true prayer warrior.

whoami 12-02-2010 11:33 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by onefaith2 (Post 996503)
This type of prayer committment is what we all need. What a mighty revival we could see, but will we sacrifice at this level? I think we all have to make that decision. I would that I had already had this kind of committment. I wonder if Father Nash was married, had family or had to work? Who knows but this my friend was a true prayer warrior.

For myself, absolutely not. That would require me to neglect my child and husband. I don't think God would approve.

nahkoe 12-02-2010 11:39 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by whoami (Post 996514)
For myself, absolutely not. That would require me to neglect my child and husband. I don't think God would approve.

No, such a commitment would not require you to neglect your child or husband.

whoami 12-02-2010 11:49 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by nahkoe (Post 996518)
No, such a commitment would not require you to neglect your child or husband.

If I read that correctly, this man spent 4 hours per day in prayer by himself out in a field. I can't spare 4 hours per day for prayer in solitude without neglecting my family. If the prayer was continuous, internal, and not in solitude, then I already practice that.

nahkoe 12-02-2010 11:52 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by whoami (Post 996523)
If I read that correctly, this man spent 4 hours per day in prayer by himself out in a field. I can't spare 4 hours per day for prayer in solitude without neglecting my family. If the prayer was continuous, internal, and not in solitude, then I already practice that.

What things look like isn't the same for everyone, even if the commitment is the same. It'd look a lot different for a mama than for a single man. Again, different for a married man or woman, or man with children, single parents....but none of those life commitments mean one can't make the same sort of commitment to God that this man did.

Purple 12-02-2010 11:53 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
I'm enjoying a juvenile book series called "Warriors" by Erin Hunter. I always get more fun out of kid stuff. ^_^

whoami 12-02-2010 11:58 AM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by nahkoe (Post 996526)
What things look like isn't the same for everyone, even if the commitment is the same. It'd look a lot different for a mama than for a single man. Again, different for a married man or woman, or man with children, single parents....but none of those life commitments mean one can't make the same sort of commitment to God that this man did.

I agree with this. I should have worded my comment better - I cannot duplicate this man's actions without neglecting my family.

Sam 12-02-2010 12:38 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by whoami (Post 996514)
For myself, absolutely not. That would require me to neglect my child and husband. I don't think God would approve.

I don't know about Father Nash's personal life, whether he had family or not. I just assume he was single and could travel this way and spend time in prayer this way. Not all of us can do that because of jobs, family responsibility, etc. Evidently his calling was as a prayer warrior or intercessor and that's what he did like full time. Others of us may be called as prayer warriors or intercessors and our time of prayer is fit into our schedule so we can meet family obligations, etc. This does not mean a person who spends half an hour a day praying is less spiritual than someone who spends 6-8 hours a day praying.

Sam 12-02-2010 12:39 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by nahkoe (Post 996518)
No, such a commitment would not require you to neglect your child or husband.

1 Corinthians chapter 7 has something to say about how much time a married person can spend in prayer and fasting.

Maximilian 12-02-2010 01:31 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by *AQuietPlace* (Post 883647)
The Prodigal God
Pagan Christianity

Excellent read. :thumbsup

Maximilian 12-02-2010 01:32 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nitehawk013 (Post 822917)
Temper Your Child's Tantrums, Bringing UP Boys and Dare to Discipline by Dobson.

Re-reading Whats so Amazing About Grace by Yancey again.

I have probably a dozen other books i have started but not finished. LOL.

:thumbsup

Has anyone read his book on the Book of Job "Where is God When It Hurts?"

Maximilian 12-02-2010 01:34 PM

Re: What are you reading currently?
 
Gordon Fee has some great reads for you theological types (more book-form stuff than his exegetical commentaries).

Needing some novels. Looking Tolstoy.


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