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Old 12-30-2020, 05:00 AM
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Amanah Amanah is offline
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Sabbath and bible feasts

Brother Esaias

You previously posted on the Sabbath and bible Feast days in the past. I want to consider incorporating bible holy days for my family.

Is there a book you can recommend on this. Or, would you compile a Calendar/synopsis as a starting point.

I would like to replace the pagan calendar with a biblical calendar and make it enjoyable for my family so they see it as gaining rather than just losing traditions.
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Old 12-30-2020, 05:20 AM
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

I'll be on the road most of the day today, but Lord willing I will post more this evening.

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Old 12-30-2020, 05:28 PM
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

It's complicated

https://www.hebrew4christians.com/Ho.../holidays.html
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Old 12-30-2020, 07:36 PM
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

I have attached a pdf of the Biblical Calendar.

The Divine Calendar consists of a weekly Sabbath, monthly "new moons" (marking the beginning of each month), 7 yearly or annual sabbaths and their associated days, a year long land sabbath every seven years, and a year long sabbath and "jubilee" every 50 years.

The new moons were a time keeping method, identifying when each month began in order to keep track of when each of the annual feasts began. Individuals were not required to do anything on the new moons, that was purely something for the priests to keep track of as printed calculated calendars did not exist. The new moons did however sometimes become a handy excuse for people to have a "mini feast" (see for example 1 Sam 20:5), but this was not required by God.

The yearly feasts were:

First month - Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread
Third month - Firstfruits (Pentecost)
Seventh month - Day of Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles and the Last Great Day

In the first month (Abib, occurring in the spring), the 14th day was the day of the Passover, when the Passover lambs were slain and cooked. The next day, the 15th day of the first month, was the First Day of the weeklong feast of Unleavened Bread. This day was a sabbath, as was the last day of Unleavened Bread (the seventh day of the feast, which was the 21st day of the month Abib). The intervening days between the First and the Seventh Day of Unleavened Bread were not sabbaths.

In the third month was the Feast of Firstfruits. It is called Pentecost (meaning 50th) because of the way in which its date was determined. On the morning after the sabbath of the first day of Unleavened Bread, an omer (a sheaf, a small sample) of the firstfruits were brought to the Temple and waved by the priest. From that day, one counted 50 days. That 50th day was the official feast of the Firstfruits, when the harvest was complete. This day was also a sabbath.

In the seventh month several things took place. The month was announced (as all months were) by the blowing of trumpets at the sighting of the first visible crescent of the new moon. In the seventh month, this announcement took on a special significance, as it heralded the seventh month in which occurred the Day of Atonement and the Feast of Tabernacles. This day was a sabbath, and was commemorated by loud noisemaking throughout the land.

The 10th day of the seventh month (ten days after Trumpets) was the Day of Atonement. This day was a sabbath, and was also a mandatory fast day. It is the only fast day God commanded for His people.

The 15th day of the seventh month was the first day of Tabernacles, and was a sabbath. The remaining six days of the week of Tabernacles were not sabbaths. The feast of Tabernacles was also the fall harvest festival.

The day after the last day of Tabernacles, known as "the Last Great Day", was a sabbath. This day was the 22nd day of the seventh month. Although it was not technically part of the Tabernacles festival, because it occurred the day after the last day of Tabernacles, it obviously is joined to it much as Passover is joined to the weeklong feast of unleavened Bread.

A sabbath is a rest day and set apart to God. No ordinary labor is to be performed (your regular daily work, whether your job or household chores, or business related work, or projects that would constitute "work"). For the weekly Sabbath, cooking and food preparing was supposed to take place the day before (the "Preparation"), so that cooking and meal making would not have to be done on the weekly Sabbath. However, the annual sabbaths have an allowance for food preparation (you can cook on those days). This is due to the fact that occasionally one of the annual sabbath days would occur either the day before or the day after the weekly Sabbath. In which case you would have two consecutive days which were both sabbaths. So rather than requiring people to either go hungry on one of those days, or else make three days worth of food on the day before the sabbaths began, God simply said we can make food on the annual sabbath days (except of course for Atonement, which as mentioned was the annual fast day, or on a weekly Sabbath if the annual sabbath and the weekly one fell on the same day). After all, these are feasts, meant to be celebrated not just by individuals but by families and groups of people. That means lots of food, and that requires food preparation.

These feasts are just that - feasts. They are festive occasions, meant to be celebrated with eating. Think traditional Thanksgiving, Christmas, or Easter celebrations. They are sabbaths, so they are days of rest. No mowing the yard, doing the laundry, reporting to the office, etc. Also no requiring others to do such (any employees one might have, one's work animals, or frequenting businesses for the purpose of transacting business, etc). They are holy convocations, meaning they are meant to be occasions for the faithful to gather, pray, and worship God.

Some notes about how each feast was kept:

Unleavened Bread - prior to the start of this feast, all the leaven was collected and removed from the house. Anything containing leaven was likewise removed from the house. Either eaten, burned, or thrown away. So that during the seven days from the 15th day of Abib to the 21st day of Abib no leaven was in the house and no leavened food was eaten.

Tabernacles - keeping this feast involved the construction of a sukka (plural "sukkoth"), a temporary dwelling place, a booth or tabernacle. Basically a tent. The instructions include the gathering of branches and limbs of "goodly trees" for the use in the construction of the booth or tabernacle, and essentially "living" in the booth for seven days. This can be as complete as actually moving in to the booth, or as simple as eating meals in the booth each day. The idea is to spend time in the tabernacle.

A note about rabbinical rules: The rabbinics made up tons of various rules and regulations for the weekly Sabbath, the annual sabbath feast days, etc. These rules included such inventions as the "sabbath day's journey", prohibition against handling musical instruments, prohibitions against handling money, two fast days per week (instead of the one annual fast commanded by God), specific prayers and various washings and pourings of water, specific regulations regarding the "correct" construction of a booth, etc etc. None of those rules were given by God, and are not binding on Christians.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf BibleCalendarCorrected.pdf (103.9 KB, 4 views)
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Last edited by Esaias; 12-30-2020 at 08:02 PM.
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Old 12-30-2020, 07:57 PM
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amanah View Post
It's complicated whenever the rabbis get involved in anything.

Also, these aren't "Jewish feasts", they are the Feasts of the LORD:
Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, Concerning the feasts of the LORD, which ye shall proclaim to be holy convocations, even these are my feasts.
(Lev 23:2)
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Old 12-30-2020, 10:37 PM
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.
(Exo 20:8-11)
A key concept is that of holiness. To keep the Sabbath holy (or any of the other sabbaths, for that matter) involves separation. Holiness means separation. A thing is holy when it is separated from regular, ordinary, profane use, and separated to God, to divine service.

For example, a baptism is technically simply a bath. But there are things that separate baptism from an ordinary bath. The invocation of the name of Jesus Christ in prayer, the intent, the solemnity that surrounds it, these things separate a baptism from a mere bath.

So it is with both the weekly Sabbath, and the annual sabbaths. They should be separated from the other regular ordinary days of the week/year.

Obviously, one way is through the use of rest. Since we cease from ordinary labour on those days, as God ceased from His labour of creation on the first Sabbath, we separate the day from the ordinary days. It is different. Moreover, by imitating our Father, we further separate it from the other ordinary days, because we are doing things on that day in particular imitation of Him (He is our example). Interestingly, in doing this, we also in a sense sanctify the other ordinary days. God did His work during the 6 ordinary days f the first week, we do our work during the 6 days f the regular week. So even the profane or ordinary becomes in a sense sanctified by keeping the Sabbath holy (sanctified). Setting apart the seventh day to the Lord by simply doing what He said to do, because He said to do it, provides for a sanctification of all of our time, as being devoted to God, each day or aspect in its proper place.

Another aspect of separating the day involves recognising and demarcating or marking off the beginning and end of the day. When the 6th day ends, and the Sabbath begins, we are now on holy time, as it were. So marking that transition from ordinary to sacred can be a very expedient and worthwhile thing to do. In other words, do something different at the start and at the end of the Sabbath (whether the weekly Sabbath or any other sabbath). Our family "welcomes the Sabbath" and "says goodbye to the Sabbath" as it were at it's start and end. (We're not really saying "good bye" though, we are simply indicating that we are back on ordinary time. And by doing such, even ordinary time becomes in a sense holy, as dedicated to God's purposes. Workdays for work, Sabbath for rest, as God established.)

Our Friday evening meal (the first evening of the Sabbath, at the start of the Sabbath) is usually as nice a meal as we can make it (without necessarily making it a full blown Thanksgiving type meal, of course). We used to use special plateware and tablecloth and table setting that we didn't use throughout the rest of the week. I say used to because that stuff has now gotten old and it's probably time to replace it with some new table ware lol.

We begin with prayer. We usually actually sing Psalm 95:1-6, with verses 7-11 being prayed, and including at the very least Hebrews 4:9 and 4:11 or words to the same effect. We then pray a prayer of thanksgiving for both the Sabbath and the food, and conclude with Psalm 67:1-2.

At the end of the Sabbath, we give thanks for God's rest and for His blessings, and then usually pray or sing Psalm 24 (which is according to the Greek Bible and ancient tradition the psalm for the first day of the week), thus announcing as it were that we are now in the first of the week and back on ordinary time.

The annual feast days are usually a little bit more involved, but it's really like the way people do Christmas or Thanksgiving or Easter or whatever, in that they decorate their house and do various things to indicate those days are "holidays". The difference here is that we're talking about God's calendar, with the emphasis being where God placed it, rather than what the world's doing or thinking or emphasizing.

Tabernacles is like picnicking or even camping. Passover is like a big Easter celebration. Our kids often do a "leaven hunt" going through the house and collecting whatever leaven can be found, including some of the leavened items we have hid in various places. Pentecost is like a one day Thanksgiving event, but we do get involved in the "counting" of the days each day from Passover forward. It helps connect Passover with Pentecost. Trumpets is almost like a version of New Year's Day with all the noisemaking, although it isn't about any "new year" or making noise for the sake of making noise, obviously.

There are lots of ways to keep God's holy days. The basic guidelines are given in the Scripture (both old testament and new testament), but most of the details are necessarily left to us. The main thing is we begin to see our entire life and it's "time cycles" being regulated by God and His Word. It takes the old saying "God is in charge" and makes it even more real and experiential to us on a daily, weekly, and yearly basis.

Now, it IS somewhat difficult considering our surrounding society is obviously not in tune with any of this. But if anything that just reminds us that we are really pilgrims and strangers here in this world system, that our God is SEPARATE from the world and it's ways and we are, too.

At this point, I couldn't imagine going back to the world and its vain traditions. I'd be utterly bored and unsatisfied.
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Last edited by Esaias; 12-30-2020 at 10:40 PM.
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Old 12-31-2020, 03:53 AM
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Amanah Amanah is offline
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

Do you commemorate the last supper every Sabbath? If so, with unleavened bread and wine/grape juice?
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Old 12-31-2020, 04:00 AM
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Amanah Amanah is offline
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

I'm going to mark my calendar for the feast days and have a go at it.
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Old 12-31-2020, 06:34 AM
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Amanah Amanah is offline
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

When I marked my calendar, I noticed that the new moon is identified, so knowing that the biblical calendar begins March after the new moon, and passover is two weeks later, and pentecost is 50 days afterwards made the calendar comprehensible.

My first goal for 2021 is to finish reading the Septuagint by the end of February.
Second goal is to do a study on bible holy days before passover.

Last edited by Amanah; 12-31-2020 at 06:38 AM.
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Old 12-31-2020, 11:25 AM
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Re: Sabbath and bible feasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amanah View Post
Do you commemorate the last supper every Sabbath? If so, with unleavened bread and wine/grape juice?
We commemorate the last supper as it's called at Passover with unleavened bread, wine, and foot washing.

The Lord's Supper is any meal shared by Christians. Such can be done whenever Christians eat together. I do not see a requirement in Scripture for the Lord's Supper to use unleavened bread (except during the feast of unleavened bread). I know the Roman Catholic church (and many Protestant catholics) teach the Lord's Supper must always use unleavened bread, but I think they are wrong in their reasoning.
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Last edited by Esaias; 12-31-2020 at 11:49 AM.
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